Tag Archives: health

Pay less for ‘Nature and Wellbeing in the Digital Age’

“We need more nature, not less technology.”

My 2017 book ‘Nature and Wellbeing in the Digital Age’ is one year old this month and I’m marking its first birthday with a permanent price reduction.

  • Find out how our smartphones, tablets and computers connect us to the natural world.
  • Learn 50 ways to bring your own digital life closer to nature.
  • This book is not about giving up technology, it’s about opening up your life.

New prices

USA Paperback now $8.99 (was $10.99) Kindle now $4.00 (was $4.99) See at Amazon USA
UK Paperback now £6.40 (was £8.43) Kindle now £2.84 (was £3.81)* See at Amazon UK

Readers gave it 5 stars. This is what they said:

“New ideas about how we manage a healthy wired life which don’t involve turning off our devices. I like the range of suggested ways to stay connected with nature as well as the Internet. This book enables me to feel good about making the most of the technological advances which offer us different opportunities to live life to the full.”

“I have always had a deep connection to nature. I don’t need to worry about how much nature I experience. I walk a lot. I run usually in lovely countryside. Yet having finished this book there are things I am going to change in my work environment. As a writer I need to glue backside to seat for many hours. Having just finished writing a book myself my eyes hurt from the screen time and I had to immerse myself in nature for a bit before I could even begin to tackle all that online marketing… blog posts, tweets, articles for magazines etc that books entail. I thought I would never write another book again! I think a few small changes to my writing space and I will be onto the next book. Thank you Sue Thomas. I will be recommending this to some worried parents too.”

“Virtual or natural worlds? Both please! This book is a great reminder to explore the fusion between our virtual and natural worlds. It doesn’t have to be one or the other. The book is full of great tips and activities for taking care of ourselves online and offline.”

“Really thought provoking. As someone who loves my digital life, it’s great to be told that I don’t need to feel guilty about that! I like the useful tips on how to create a better connection with my natural environment.”

“Humans are addicted to apps & devices engineered to attract & distract our attention, but we also are soothed by nature. We’re all conflicted about the amount of time we spend online, looking at our phones, and most people I know are increasingly ambivalent. So much of the critical writing about this dilemma is about weaning yourself, logging off. I like Thomas’ book because it strives for a middle ground — how to appreciate the natural world as a kind of antidote to the techno-trance.”

Feel better without logging off

*UK prices may vary because they are generated by Amazon from US prices

OUT NOW Paperback edition of ‘Nature and Wellbeing in the Digital Age’

When I published the Kindle edition of ‘Nature and Wellbeing in the Digital Age, I was quite surprised to find that lots of people I know don’t read e-books at all. They asked for a paperback version and I didn’t have one. But now I do.  It’s on sale at Amazon from today, so if you prefer paperbacks to e-books, now you can get one!

Is the paperback different from the e-book?

Just a tiny bit – the paperback includes a few images which were difficult to incorporate into the e-book. I’ve updated the structure and cover to match the paperback, so if you own an older copy of the e-book you’ll notice some changes to the way the content is organised, and some of the headings have changed, but basically it’s pretty much the same.

Buy the paperback

Digital Wellbeing Facebook Group

Join me in Facebook to discuss your own experiments and ideas on how we can feel better without logging off. There’s a lot to talk about!

 

Biophilia for patients and visitors at the Khoo Tech Puat Hospital, Singapore

Khoo Teck Puat Hospital
Khoo Teck Puat Hospital, Singapore

This week I’m in Singapore as a Visiting Professor in the Biophilia Research Cluster, based in the Department of Psychology at James Cook University. I’ve seen dozens of fascinating examples of biophilic design here, but this post is about just one of them – the incredible gardens at Khoo Teck Puat Hospital.

It’s a general and acute care hospital which opened in 2010. Laik Teng Lit, its CEO, commissioned a design which lowers stress levels and helps patients and visitors to relax in what can so often be a naturally very anxious situation. The result is an astonishingly vibrant environment with dense plantings, water features, and carefully designed natural materials across the six floors of the building.

Khoo Teck Puat Hospital
Khoo Teck Puat Hospital

The hospital is keen to engage its visitors in auditing the wild inhabitants too, so it records all the many different birds and butterflies spotted on the site.

Some weekends there are free classes in yoga, tai chi, and meditation which are open to the public and take place next to the groundfoor waterfall amidst a biophilic riot of colourful plants and foliage.

And there’s another added extra. A rooftop organic community garden is cultivated and managed by local residents who grow a stunning variety of fruits and vegetables. Some of the produce is given to patients and some is sold to pay for the upkeep of the space.

Fig Tree at the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital Rooftop Garden
Fig Tree at the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital Rooftop Garden
Vegetable Beds at the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital Rooftop Garden
Vegetable Beds at the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital Rooftop Garden

Coincidentally, this week The Conversation featured an article about a rooftop garden project at a church in Sydney, Australia. This one was designed for patients recovering from mental illness, but the principles  remain the same – stress reduction, wellbeing, and general health benefits.

Giant melon in the Vegetable Beds at the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital Rooftop Garden
Giant melon at the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital Rooftop Garden

At Khoo Teck Puat we were told that members of the community are encouraged to spend time in the hospital’s social spaces. In other words, you don’t have to be sick to go there. And indeed, many students take their laptops and study amongst the flowers, whilst older people and families also regularly go to the hospital just to chill out and relax!